The Student News Site Of Central Kitsap High School

Cougar Chronicle

The Student News Site Of Central Kitsap High School

Cougar Chronicle

The Student News Site Of Central Kitsap High School

Cougar Chronicle

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Broadcast’s Back in Business

Central Kitsap High School’s broadcast team share current joys, challenges, and advice as the school year begins.
Broadcast+class+working+in+Tracewells+room.
Taylor Wells
Broadcast class working in Tracewell’s room.

The broadcast has always been a prominent part of Central Kitsap High School, delivering videos every Thursday that feature clubs, people, sports, and current trends in Central Kitsap, as well as funny skits and weather updates.

The class works very hard to pump out videos on their weekly deadline, editing and stitching together the clips they filmed into one cohesive piece of media. There are many things members of broadcast love about the class, though deadlines may be considered a slight challenge for some. 

“Deadlines keep you honest and deadlines give you something to shoot for, and I’m always amazed and happy with what my class accomplishes by the deadline,” said David Tracewell, advisor of the broadcast class. 

While Tracewell himself dislikes deadlines, his perspective offers a unique view on how they can push students to better themselves and grow as a person. 

“…probably deadlines, trying to get everyone on track and making sure that the broadcast stays consistent every single week,” said Samuel “Sam” Cogill. Cogill is a senior student in broadcast and has been in the class since sophomore year, but has been doing broadcast since seventh grade. 

Despite what stresses deadlines may bring, the students in broadcast love the class. The environment is light-hearted and it isn’t uncommon to hear uproarious laughter come from whichever area they’re working in.

Broadcast students working on recording for a Thursday broadcast. (Taylor Wells)

“I like editing a lot,” said Cogill. “I like how everyone has their own style of projects and how everything comes together and broadcast kind of shows off the whole school and everyone.” 

There are multiple opportunities that can come from broadcast, whether it be to learn video editing, managing deadlines, or building stronger bonds with those around you.

“So far it feels like we’ve bonded a lot, I already consider them family to me,” said Akira Vaughns, a senior and newcomer to broadcast. “It’s pretty cool.”

Familial bonds are hard to come by in classrooms nowadays, depending on the type of class you choose. Being able to create such deep platonic bonds with one another is one of the hidden gems of high school, being able to grow closer to those around you, maybe even some you’ve known since middle school or elementary school. 

“[What] I love most about broadcast is the growth that every individual in this class will have and even way before the end of the semester,” said Tracewell. “The technical aspects they’ll master editing and shooting — but it’s the personal growth, the confidence of putting yourself in front of the camera or the confidence of producing something for all your peers to see — because that’s tough, especially in this day and age.”

The class offers a place for student growth and confidence building. All students are encouraged to join regardless of their level of experience in broadcast and media production. 

“I encourage them to sign up,” said Tracewell. “When I was in high school I sat in the back of the classroom. I was very introverted and I knew when I became a teacher that I would have to be a little more extroverted, and so if you have the aptitude and can love video and content like that… Even if you’re shy sign up, because you’ll grow in so many ways. As diverse [of] a group as we have, it makes it so much better, because everyone has a different gift,” said Tracewell. 

Broadcast students editing in class. (Taylor Wells)

Broadcast is a place with many diverse talents, as well as a place to hone your own talents in ways you may have not thought were possible. Whether that be your confidence growth or technical abilities, broadcast is the place to be if you’re looking for a place to grow as a person and potentially find long lasting bonds.

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About the Contributor
Taylor Wells, Reporter, Copy Editor
Taylor Wells (she/her) born in 2007 and is currently 16 years old. She is the daughter of James and Jessica Magee, and older sister of 4-year-old Isla, and 2-year-old Jaxson. Her hobbies include reading, drawing, writing, and playing video games. A few games she enjoys playing are Cyberpunk 2077, The Last of Us Part 1 and 2, and NieR:Automata. When it comes to her academics, it can be a bit lacking at times. She has a tendency to procrastinate, waiting till the last minute, or even past the due date to turn in/do important work. Nevertheless, she’s able to get it done, knowing that a 20% is better than a 0% as a whole. She has done well enough that her report card doesn’t reflect those ‘small’ mistakes, showing A’s and B’s. She chose to take journalism because it seemed genuinely interesting to her. Taylor has always loved writing in general and taking a class that depends on a person’s writing skills on opinionated or quick to get topics seemed eye catching to her. She’s been in Journalism for three years now and will likely continue till her last year of high school.  
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